Hudson River Audubon Society of Westchester
A New York Chapter of the National Audubon Society
Serving the communities of Ardsley, Dobbs Ferry,
Hastings-on-Hudson, Irvington and Yonkers

Beverly E. Smith
Butterfly/Hummingbird Garden

Visit our butterfly garden at the Lenoir Nature Preserve in Yonkers, NY.
It's in full bloom and you can expect to see both butterflies and hummingbirds
till mid-October and beyond.

Check out our garden's Facebook Page

 

Hudson River Audubon Butterfly/Hummingbird Garden at Lenoir Nature Preserve


    Hudson River Audubon maintains a large butterfly and hummingbird garden at Lenoir Nature Preserve, run and owned by the Westchester County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation. It was created in the spring of 1995 for the education and enjoyment of the community. Much of the credit for its creation and maintenance goes to Beverly Smith and her husband Neil. The garden was first dedicated in July 1998. In the spring of 2001 we added a hummingbird garden. In 2004 it was rededicated in June as the Beverly E. Smith Butterfly Garden.  It has expanded each year. 

    This new addition showed its reward by hosting a Rufous Hummingbird in late fall and winter. This rare species drew birders (bird-watchers) from near and far. This species normally occurs in the far west of North America and winters in Mexico.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH OUR GARDEN GROW!

    Dozens of species of butterflies are seen every year and we invite you to visit, explore its paths and relax on its benches while swallowtails, sulphurs, Great Spangled Fritillaries, Monarchs, American Ladies and Silver-spotted Skippers fly about. Our butterfly brochure can be found at the garden or inside the nature center at Lenoir.

    Maintaining a butterfly garden takes volunteers. We need people to plant, weed, water, maintain walkways etc. Please join our group of friendly volunteers. To help out, contact our Butterfly Committee chair, Mary Harrington, 914-667-1494 Email: TCTallon@aol.com or click on Volunteer Opportunities.

ABOUT BUTTERFLIES

A Butterfly Garden is designed to attract as many species of butterflies as possible by growing nectar producing plants and shrubs.   The garden may be large, with many types of plants, or it may be only a few choice plants grown in a container or window box.

The purpose of a butterfly garden is to attract these beautiful insects for our own pleasure, and to provide an extension of their  decreasing habitat.  A planned butterfly garden provides food for the adults and includes host food plants for the larvae.  Most butterflies lay their eggs on very specific plants.  For example, the Monarch Butterfly will lay her eggs on a milkweed plant because that is the only type of plant the emerging larvae will eat.

It is important to provide shelter from severe weather and for hibernation.   Butterflies will squeeze into narrow slits such as spaces between logs in log piles.  Butterfly houses may be used to simulate natural shelters and are similar to birdhouses with slits in them.  A small, shallow water area with round rocks will provide drinking water and sunning areas.  Butterflies love to spread their wings and bask in the sun.

Butterflies enjoy rotted and fermented fruit placed on an elevated tray.  Butterfly feeders using nectar can be put out as an additional food source.

If possible, the garden should be planted in a sheltered, sunny area away from strong wind. A hedge or wall makes a good protection.

Numerous books about butterflies and butterfly gardens are available in libraries and bookstores.

    Below you'll find our plant list for the garden, for a list of butterflies that have been seen in the City of Yonkers: 
  Butterflies of Yonkers

 PLANT LIST - BUTTERFLY GARDEN  PLANT LIST - HUMMINGBIRD GARDEN

PERENNIALS 

Jerusalem Artichoke (pictured right)
Common milkweed 
Milkweed Incarnata 
Butterfly Weed (milkweed tuberosa) 
Indigo (Baptista Australis) 
Native Daylilies 
Native Geranium
Monarda didymas 
Violets
Liatris 
Gallardia
Foxgloves 
Rue
Evening Primrose 
Perennial salvia species 
Yarrow 
Coreopsis 
Veronica 
Margueritas
Black-eyed susan
Echinacea
Flax
Asters
Aquigela
Iris
Dicentra
Scabiosa
Physostegia
Penstemon
Phlox
Heuchera
Lambs' ears (Stachys)
Jacob's Ladder
Astilbe
Yellow Coneflower
Yellow Butterfly Bush
Lavender 

ANNUALS
Most annuals are attractive to butterflies. Color does not seem to make a difference. Here are a few that are in the garden

Tithonia (pictured right)
Cosmos 
Zinnias 
Snapdragons 
Blue Salvia (Strata) 
Four o'clocks 
Larkspur 
Marigolds 
Ageratum
Nicotiana
Dahlias
Pineapple Sage
Gazania

SHRUBS AND BUSHES

Butterfly Bush  (pictured right)
Spicebush 
Clethra 
Spirea 
High Bush Cranberry 
Blueberries
Chrysanthemum
Viburnum carlessi
Potentilla
Native Spirea
Goldenrod

 

PERENNIALS

Coreopsis 
Tithonia 
Lobelia cardinalis 
Hyssop 
Lychnis 
Agastache
Korean Mint
Trumpet Vine

ANNUALS
Pineapple Sage 
Salvia
Annual milkweed (tropical milkweed)
Cleome (spider plant) 

BUSHES AND SHRUBS

Wiegela
Azaleas
Kolkwitzia


HERBS ON BANK

Sage
Thyme
Parsley
Oregano
Catmint
Hyssop

Gardening links

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